No. 424
Crime, Eccentricity, and the Sporting Life in 19th Century America.
May 27, 2019

Dan Creedon in Training.

June 4, 2013
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Chapter 2
The last Automat in New York City closed its doors in 1991, and I wish I had the foresight back then to give the hot coffee and much-heralded slices of pie a try. Instead, I’ll have to suffice with memoirs and stories from old-timers, who happily recall the more than 40 Automats scattered across the […]
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Ephemeral New York - 5/26/2019


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Coming in May! Warps and Wefts is excited to announce the publication of “Dressing Miss Lizzie”, a collection of paper …

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Lizzie Borden : Warps & Wefts - 4/23/2019
Wikileaks published this incident report from the monumental trove of war secrets leaked at incredible personal cost by whistleblower Chelsea Manning. AAA MISSION/OPERATION: IRAQI FREEDOM VI / CJSOTF-AP BBB WHO: MAJOR ABBAS MOHAMMED ARDANI (HADITHAH SWAT CDR) CCC WHAT: ALLEGEDLY TRANSFERRED A HADITHA SWAT PRISONER TO FACILITATE EJK. (MNC-I CCIR #8) DDD WHERE: 38S KC […]
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ExecutedToday.com - 5/26/2019

Jeff and Joe Soapy Smith buries Joe Simmons The Illustrated Police News April 9, 1892 (Click image to enlarge) oe Simmons was a tall, slender gambler known to many as “Gambler Joe” Simmons, a member of the Soap Gang who managed Soapy Smith's Tivoli Club in Denver, 1890, and Soapy's Orleans Club in Creede, 1892. According to William Devere’s poem "Two Little Busted Shoes," Simmons
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Soapy Smith's Soap Box - 3/25/2019
Anne C. Chapman went to the First National Bank of Warsaw, Indiana, in September 1880, to cash a check for $300. The cashier did not hesitate; the check was signed by her father, the director of the bank. During the course of business that day, her father came across the check and immediately pronounced the signature a forgery. He reported the crime and had his daughter arrested, refusing to
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Murder by Gaslight - 5/25/2019
This week's Link Dump is sponsored by the lovely and talented Princess Mickey. Brooklyn Cat Show 1948, via New York Public Library Some peculiar wedding ceremonies from the past. A professional malpractioner. First, it was the bones of Richard III.  Now, it's the remains of Queen Emma. When Agatha Christie met true crime. What the Chinese are discovering on the dark side of
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Strange Company - 5/24/2019
[Editor’s note: Guest writer, Peter Dickson, lives in West Sussex, England and has been working with microfilm copies of The Duncan Campbell Papers from the State Library of NSW, Sydney, Australia. The following are some of his analyses of what he has discovered from reading these papers. Dickson has contributed many transcriptions to the Jamaica Family […]
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Early American Crime - 2/7/2019
Jos. Schlitz Brewing Co. | Undercover Lunatic.

Dan Creedon in Training.

Dan Creedon in TrainingThe plucky Australian Middle-weight punches the bag at his quarters near St. Louis, Mo. [more]

Dan Creedon, whose portrait appears in this issue of the Police Gazette, is the middleweight champion of Australia, and s matched to fight Bob Fitzsimmons, middleweight champion of the world, at 154 pounds for $5,000 and the championship of the world in the Olympic Club, New Orleans. Creedon is a clever and scientific boxer, a hard hitter, and possesses great stamina. He has fought numerous battles in Australia, and came to this country with the title of middleweight champion. Since his arrival from Australia he has engaged in many glove contests—the most important one being with Alec Greggains of San Francisco. They fought for $9,000 at Roby, Ind., on Aug. 14 1893. Greggains had quite a reputation and many booked him to defeat Creedon. The latter displayed great generalship and tremendous hitting power and after fighting fifteen rounds, according to “Police Gazette” rules, in 55 minutes he knocked Greggains out. Creedon’s victory over Greggains gained him quite a reputation and Col. J. D. Hopkins the popular theatrical manager and backer, issued a challenge to back Creedon to fight Bob Fitzsimmons for $5,000 a side at the same time posting $500 forfeit. Fitzsimmons did not pay any attention to the challenge and Creedon gave up all hope of ever meeting the former until the present match was arranged. Creedon is now training near St. Louis, and from the latest advices form his backer he was in first-class condition and confident of winning.

 


Reprinted from The National Police Gazette, September 22, 1894.