No. 432
Crime, Eccentricity, and the Sporting Life in 19th Century America.
July 23, 2019

Ought to be Ashamed of Herself.

Miss Venus De Medici, of Italy, outranges the ideas of Norwalk, Conn., Citizens and is Garbed.
May 30, 2016
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Chapter 2
Thomas Thomasen Bisp, an adulterer who fatally poisoned his wife after he got the hots for his maid, became on this date in 1822 the last person executed in the North Jutland city of Hjørring. Times being what they were, the torture-spectacle parts of the sentence — like having his offending hand struck off — […]
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ExecutedToday.com - 7/22/2019


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In honor of Lizzie’s birthday, one, in what will become a series of free downloads to augment your Dressing Miss …

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Lizzie Borden : Warps & Wefts - 7/19/2019
"San Francisco Examiner," August 29, 1903, via Newspapers.com It seems inevitable that rich, powerful families attract any number of strange incidents. Dysfunction abounds, perhaps as the Universe's way of balancing out all those material advantages. It's unusual, however, for one relatively small family of wealth to become famed for internal feuds, mental illness, odd disappearances,
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Strange Company - 7/22/2019

Jeff and Joe Soapy Smith buries Joe Simmons The Illustrated Police News April 9, 1892 (Click image to enlarge) oe Simmons was a tall, slender gambler known to many as “Gambler Joe” Simmons, a member of the Soap Gang who managed Soapy Smith's Tivoli Club in Denver, 1890, and Soapy's Orleans Club in Creede, 1892. According to William Devere’s poem "Two Little Busted Shoes," Simmons
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Soapy Smith's Soap Box - 3/25/2019
Adolph Stein was a 35year-old Polish immigrant living in Cedar Rapids, Iowa when he met Lizzie Loering, a widow with two little children and $30,000 in assets. After a whirlwind courtship, the two were married in June 1880. Stein had been prominent in political circles in Cedar Rapids, but earlier that spring he was indicted for illegally selling liquor. He decided to move his new bride to
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Murder by Gaslight - 7/20/2019
This is the story of an 1889 painting, a mysterious stone wall, and a religious institution that occupied part of today’s Central Park in the mid-19th century—before the park was even in the planning stages. It starts with Impressionist painter William Merritt Chase. He was dubbed the “artistic interpreter” of Central Park and Prospect Park […]
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Ephemeral New York - 7/21/2019
[Editor’s note: Guest writer, Peter Dickson, lives in West Sussex, England and has been working with microfilm copies of The Duncan Campbell Papers from the State Library of NSW, Sydney, Australia. The following are some of his analyses of what he has discovered from reading these papers. Dickson has contributed many transcriptions to the Jamaica Family […]
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Early American Crime - 2/7/2019
A Successful Trip. | A Pair of Turtle Doves.

Ought to be Ashamed of Herself.

ought to be ashamed

Miss Venus De Medici, of Italy, outranges the ideas of Norwalk, Conn., Citizens and is Garbed. [more]

Norwalk, Conn., hs just had a nude departure in the figure of Venus, which, up to a few days ago, adorned the lawn of Justice of the Peace Andrew Selleck. The statue came from Italy, and, as is usual with such statues, it had forgotten to bring its clothes with it. The Squire’s neighbors weren’t accustomed to such exhibitions and on the following morning Her Highness Venus was attired in bargain-counter remnants of the cast-off clothing of the neighborhood.


Reprinted from National Police Gazette, October 19, 1889.