No. 424
Crime, Eccentricity, and the Sporting Life in 19th Century America.
May 25, 2019

Chorus Girls Fight.

Two of the charming girls who pose as "living pictures" in Rice's "1492" have a wordy war, which end
May 18, 2015
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Chapter 2
On this date in 2014, the BBC reported, businessman Mahafarid Amir-Khosravi was hanged at Tehran’s Evin Prison for defrauding banks of $2.6 billion in bad loans secured through bogus credentials. Despite getting caught, the man clearly knew which jar held the cookies since “The money was reportedly used to buy state-owned companies under the government’s […]
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ExecutedToday.com - 5/24/2019


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Coming in May! Warps and Wefts is excited to announce the publication of “Dressing Miss Lizzie”, a collection of paper …

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Lizzie Borden : Warps & Wefts - 4/23/2019
This week's Link Dump is sponsored by the lovely and talented Princess Mickey. Brooklyn Cat Show 1948, via New York Public Library Some peculiar wedding ceremonies from the past. A professional malpractioner. First, it was the bones of Richard III.  Now, it's the remains of Queen Emma. When Agatha Christie met true crime. What the Chinese are discovering on the dark side of
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Strange Company - 5/24/2019

Jeff and Joe Soapy Smith buries Joe Simmons The Illustrated Police News April 9, 1892 (Click image to enlarge) oe Simmons was a tall, slender gambler known to many as “Gambler Joe” Simmons, a member of the Soap Gang who managed Soapy Smith's Tivoli Club in Denver, 1890, and Soapy's Orleans Club in Creede, 1892. According to William Devere’s poem "Two Little Busted Shoes," Simmons
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Soapy Smith's Soap Box - 3/25/2019
Anne C. Chapman went to the First National Bank of Warsaw, Indiana, in September 1880, to cash a check for $300. The cashier did not hesitate; the check was signed by her father, the director of the bank. During the course of business that day, her father came across the check and immediately pronounced the signature a forgery. He reported the crime and had his daughter arrested, refusing to
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Murder by Gaslight - 5/25/2019
I’m not the first old sign enthusiast who came across this beauty of a beer sign on the tenement at 317 East Fifth Street. Grieve wrote it up back in January, and I’m sure other fans walking along this quiet East Village block noticed the ancient signage, too. “S. Cort Wines & Lager Beer” the […]
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Ephemeral New York - 5/19/2019
[Editor’s note: Guest writer, Peter Dickson, lives in West Sussex, England and has been working with microfilm copies of The Duncan Campbell Papers from the State Library of NSW, Sydney, Australia. The following are some of his analyses of what he has discovered from reading these papers. Dickson has contributed many transcriptions to the Jamaica Family […]
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Early American Crime - 2/7/2019
Chloroformed While She Slept. | Willie Craig Was a Girl.

Chorus Girls Fight.

Chorus Girls Fight

Two of the charming girls who pose as "living pictures" in Rice's "1492" have a wordy war, which ends in a hand-to-hand conflict.

[more]

It may have been notice by some who were in the audience at the Garden Theatre, in New York city, on a recent night that one of the ladies who appeared in several of the “living pictures” was in a very nervous and apparently almost tearful condition.

The lady was Miss Nana Walsh, who besides posing in the pictures is a member of the “1492” chorus, and according to the story told by some of the other who were behind the scenes at the time, she had very good cause to be nervous and tearful. While the preparations for the living pictures were being made a great commotion suddenly arose in one o the dressing rooms. It was found that Miss Walsh and another chorus girl, Miss Kitty Connors, were indulging in a fight. What the quarrel was about no one could learn, but before the girls could be separated, Miss Connors, who is much the larger of the two, had blackened bother her rival’s eyes, besides otherwise marring her beauty.


Reprinted from National Police Gazette, September 22,1894.