No. 465
Crime, Eccentricity, and the Sporting Life in 19th Century America.
April 04, 2020

Hazing at the Stock Board

May 8, 2011
...
...


Chapter 2
On this date in 1799, the Jacobin mayor of the Calabrian city of Crotone was shot by counterrevolutionists with three comrades. Francesco Antonio Lucifero hailed from a devilishly powerful family that had produced several prior mayors who weren’t left-wing radicals. Our Lucifero cleaved to the Parthenopean Republic, the Neapolitan revolutionary state that from the first […]
More...
ExecutedToday.com - 4/3/2020


`
When New York’s first cholera epidemic hit in 1832 and killed 3,515 people (out of a population of 250,000), the poor took the blame. “Many city officials implicated the residents of the poorest neighborhoods for contracting cholera, blaming their weak character, instead of viewing the epidemic as a public health problem,” stated Anne Garner, in […]
More...
Ephemeral New York - 3/29/2020
"The Witches' Cove," Follower of Jan Mandijn The Link Dump is here! Time to make merry! Who the hell discovered Florida? A forgotten Antarctic explorer. Catherine the Great, children's book author. The kind of thing that happens when you put an astrophysicist in lockdown. You want to know how another guy spent his lockdown?  Baking a 4,500 year-old loaf of bread.  Which surely
More...
Strange Company - 4/3/2020

Beginning on January 1st, W&W will begin featuring fascinating short clippings from the Fall River papers and other newspapers from …

Continue reading

More...
Lizzie Borden : Warps & Wefts - 12/29/2019
Robert Hoey told police that as he was coming home from work in the early hours of March 15, 1898, he literally tripped over the body of a dead woman in the courtyard of the tenement where he lived at No. 27 Monroe Street in New York City. An autopsy revealed that the woman had been strangled to death and the police believed that the body had been dragged to the courtyard known in the
More...
Murder by Gaslight - 4/4/2020
Felix B. Mulgrew 7/30/1854 - 5/30/1915 Karen Hendricks collection (Click image to enlarge) ELIX B. MULGREW friend or victim of Soapy Smith's? Karen Hendricks is the great-great-granddaughter of Felix B. Mulgrew. Mulgrew was a newspaper man, entrepreneur, Klondiker, and had some running correspondence with his friend, Jefferson Randolph "Soapy" Smith. Through Karen we learn
More...
Soapy Smith's Soap Box - 3/30/2020
[Editor’s note: Guest writer, Peter Dickson, lives in West Sussex, England and has been working with microfilm copies of The Duncan Campbell Papers from the State Library of NSW, Sydney, Australia. The following are some of his analyses of what he has discovered from reading these papers. Dickson has contributed many transcriptions to the Jamaica Family […]
More...
Early American Crime - 2/7/2019
The Bunco Game | Little Egypt.

Hazing at the Stock Board

Hazing at the Stock Board

New York, New York, April, 1884 - How the battering-ram process is applied by the bulls and bears to while away the idle hours of the dull season.[more]

The members of the New York Stock Exchange are a frisky set, and as one who knows says: "Brokers will be boys." Their wild freaks would sometimes lead a stranger to believe that they were just fresh from college.

Mr. J. C. Carey, better known as "Crosstown Carey," who has been a member of the Exchange for twenty years, was lately the victim of a terrible hazing on the floor of the Board. His arm is very lame, his chest black and blue, and his ribs an object of solicitude to his physician-all the result of the rough treatment received in the Board Room the other day at the hands of the younger brokers. Their propensity for fun had been fully awakened by hazing Mr. H. D. Knowlton, on the occasion of his debut on the floor. This gentleman being young and prepared for the reception always given to a new member, escaped from the clutches of "the boys" after a few minutes, considerably the worse for wear. Just then the hazers caught sight of Mr. Carey's portly form, and, in a spirit of pure fun, they went for him.

It was in vain that he rushed to the water cooler and threw glassfuls of the icy beverage at the advancing foes; it did not damp the ardor of their pursuit. They drove the victim into a corner, and, forming a long line, shoulder to shoulder, they rushed upon him with the force of a catapult. Many of the younger members of the Exchange are trained athletes, and this line of men swaying to and fro, gave him a terrible pounding before he could escape. Horseplay is tolerated by the laws of the Exchange, but if a member strikes another on the floor he is punished with suspension; consequently the victim of an assault of this kind is at a disadvantage. Even if this law did not exist, however, he would hesitate to strike his tormentors, knowing that there is not a grain of malice in the attack.

 


Reprinted from The National Police Gazette - April 5, 1884