No. 419
Crime, Eccentricity, and the Sporting Life in 19th Century America.
March 24, 2019

Clubbed by a Wronged Wife.

April 22, 2014
...
...


Coming Soon!
Believed to be Bascomb Smith Drawing of Bascomb upper right No provenance for photo Jeff Smith collection (Click image to enlarge) here art thou Bascomb? The following newspaper clipping is copied from the Seattle Post-intelligencer, December 4, 1899. ——— BASCOM SMITH IN JAIL. ——— Accused of Shooting at an Enemy on the Public Street. Bascom Smith, a brother
More...
Soapy Smith's Soap Box - 3/23/2019


`
I’m not sure when the low-rise buildings at the southwest corner of Mulberry and Grand Streets were torn down. But if there’s any upside to the bulldozing of another old New York corner, it’s that we now have an amazing side view of the Federal-style house at 149 Mulberry. The view is almost a portal […]
More...
Ephemeral New York - 3/17/2019
In the wee early hours on this date in 1897, the Spanish occupation shot 19 Philippines revolutionaries — the Martyrs of Aklan. Aklan is a province in the Western Visayas, and our 19 there were surrendered to a purported Spanish amnesty following the assassination of the local independence leader General Francisco del Castillo. The amnesty […]
More...
ExecutedToday.com - 3/23/2019


[Editor’s note: Guest writer, Peter Dickson, lives in West Sussex, England and has been working with microfilm copies of The Duncan Campbell Papers from the State Library of NSW, Sydney, Australia. The following are some of his analyses of what he has discovered from reading these papers. Dickson has contributed many transcriptions to the Jamaica Family […]
More...
Early American Crime - 2/7/2019
Patrick S. Donovan, better known as “Snip,” began drinking champagne after the first race at Monmouth Park in Oceanport, New Jersey, on August 6, 1893. The wine continued to flow as he watched the day’s races and Donovan appeared to be in a jovial mood, but he may have been trying to drown his sorrows. “Snip” Donovan was a successful and well-known horse trainer, but he had recently been
More...
Murder by Gaslight - 3/23/2019
Welcome to the first Link Dump of Spring 2019! Time for Strange Company HQ's spring cleaning! Where the hell did we get the phrase, "red herring?" How a child's murder became folklore. Yes, they're still trying to find Jack the Ripper. And, of course, Amelia Earhart. This week in Russian Weird: nothing to see here, just mysterious black insects taking over. There's a town in
More...
Strange Company - 3/22/2019
So- did Lizzie have a sweetheart? It would seem one Curtis I. Piece had high but unrequited hopes of winning …

Continue reading

More...
Lizzie Borden : Warps & Wefts - 2/3/2019
A Human Vampire. | Sights and Sounds of Spring.

Clubbed by a Wronged Wife.

Clubbed by Wronged Wife

A Kentucky Wife Administers a Very Severe Punishment to her Husband and his Paramour. [more]

For some time the wife of Mr. Clay Henry, a well-known resident of Corinth , Ky., has suspected him of infidelity, and has several times been informed of his frequenting Madame Bricey’s resort. This, however, Mrs. Henry refused to believe untie the other day, when she went out on a still hunt, and proved to her own satisfaction that the rumors were true. Immediately after his Sunday dinner Henry arose from the table, saying he was going into the country for a drive with a friend. Mrs. Henry tried to persuade her husband to spend his Sunday at home, but he was obstinate and left the house. Mrs. Henry suspected that he had gone to some resort, and along toward evening started out to find him.

Proceeding to Madame Bricey’s house she saw a girl inmate hanging out of a window. Mrs. Henry asked the girl if Mr. Henry was in the house, and the soiled dove replied that he was not. This did not satisfy Mrs. Henry. She slipped around the house and coming to a side entrance peeped in. There she saw her husband and Mrs. Bricey occupying the same bed. Mrs. Henry rushed in and seizing a stout stick of wood began to rain blows upon her wayward husband and his companion in sin. With the fury of a tigress the wronged wife beat both offenders until they sprang from the bed and rushed from the house.

Mrs. Henry gave pursuit to her husband, but he could run faster and soon escaped. He has not been seen since, and has fled for parts unknown. Mrs. Bricey returned to her resort as soon as the coast was clear. She was considerably bruised up about the face and arms, and will show signs of the clubbing she received. As Mrs. Henry and her club devoted more time to Mr. Henry than Mrs. Bricey, it is certain that he is pretty badly damaged. It is thought Henry went to Cincinnati, and will remained there until the excitement blows over.


Reprinted from the National Police Gazette, October 14, 1893