No. 445
Crime, Eccentricity, and the Sporting Life in 19th Century America.
October 23, 2019

Their Name a Misnomer.

February 28, 2012
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Chapter 2
via Newspapers.com In which an opera house gets an unusual gate-crasher. The "Ottawa Citizen," December 20, 1930: LONDON (By mail) A ghost-floating over the heads of a thousand dancers at Covent Garden opera house one night recently brought the music to an abrupt stop, while Mr. Herman Darewski, the conductor, sank into a chair horrified, and the baton slipped from his fingers. The light
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Strange Company - 10/23/2019


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Lizzie’s Old School Chum, Augusta Poole (Mrs. Cyrus Tripp) Shelley M. Dziedzic, October 2019 (all rights reserved) During the hot …

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Lizzie Borden : Warps & Wefts - 10/19/2019
On this date in 1943, French abortionist Désiré Pioge was guillotined in Paris by the family-values Vichy regime. Very much overshadowed by the like fate shared by Marie-Louise Giraud a few weeks before, Pioge doesn’t even boast his own French Wikipedia entry — just a passing mention on Giraud’s. (Many other Giraud posts aver that […]
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ExecutedToday.com - 10/22/2019

Jeff and Joe Soapy Smith buries Joe Simmons The Illustrated Police News April 9, 1892 (Click image to enlarge) oe Simmons was a tall, slender gambler known to many as “Gambler Joe” Simmons, a member of the Soap Gang who managed Soapy Smith's Tivoli Club in Denver, 1890, and Soapy's Orleans Club in Creede, 1892. According to William Devere’s poem "Two Little Busted Shoes," Simmons
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Soapy Smith's Soap Box - 3/25/2019
In October 1893, 64-year-old Patrick Finney of New Bedford, Pennsylvania, was visiting his old friend and drinking buddy James Campbell in Hazelton, Ohio.  Campbell had been a saloonkeeper in Pittsburgh before retiring and moving with his wife to Hazelton, a suburb of Youngstown.  As was their custom, Finney and the Campbells were drinking heavily the night of October 9. James Campbell had a
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Murder by Gaslight - 10/19/2019
George Grosz made a name for himself drawing and painting caricatures of life in his native Germany during the postwar Weimar era. But this Expressionist painter who helped lead the Dada movement left Germany in 1932 and relocated to New York City, turning his cynical eye on his adopted home city. “New York Harbor,” from […]
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Ephemeral New York - 10/20/2019
[Editor’s note: Guest writer, Peter Dickson, lives in West Sussex, England and has been working with microfilm copies of The Duncan Campbell Papers from the State Library of NSW, Sydney, Australia. The following are some of his analyses of what he has discovered from reading these papers. Dickson has contributed many transcriptions to the Jamaica Family […]
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Early American Crime - 2/7/2019
Inspector Thomas F. Byrnes. | It Was Another Kind of Cat.

Their Name a Misnomer.

MisnomerAvon, Mass., Oct. 1891 - Clarence Makepeace shot and killed in a row with his hot-tempered wife in their home in Avon, Mass.

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One morning recently Clarence Makepeace of Avon, Mass., got up about 6 o’clock and asked his wife Annie, to prepare the breakfast. She demurred, and angry words followed. Makepeace threw a lamp at his wife who ran to her room followed by her husband. As he enntered the door the woman grabbed a gun and fired at him, shooting off one side of his fade. Mrs. Makepeace made no attempt to escape but stood over her husband weeping and wailing. Makepeace died from his injuries and the woman was arrested charged with his death.

Reprinted from The National Police Gazette, October 17, 1891.